A Typology of Socio-Economic Advantage and Disadvantage in Australia's Large Non-Metropolitan Cities, Towns and Regions

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Title A Typology of Socio-Economic Advantage and Disadvantage in Australia's Large Non-Metropolitan Cities, Towns and Regions
Author Baum, Scott
Journal Name Australian Geographer
Year Published 2006
Place of publication Oxford, UK
Publisher Routledge
Abstract Australia's large regional cities and towns display a wide variation in their adjustment to the socio-economic transitions that have occurred over the past decade. In terms of socio-economic advantage and disadvantage, these changes, often associated with globalisation, wider economic and technological restructuring, the changing demographics of the population and shifts in public policy, are not evenly dispersed across non-metropolitan regions. Such outcomes have been discussed across a variety of academic disciplines using a variety of data and methods, and the research undertaken has provided a useful grounding for contemporary studies both theoretically and methodologically. Analysis of new data provides an opportunity to extend and update our understanding. This paper presents an analysis of secondary data aimed at analysing non-metropolitan cities, towns and regions based on differential levels of socio-economic performance. Using an alternative clustering method, this paper groups non-metropolitan cities, towns and regions according to the degree to which they share similar socio-economic and demographic outcomes. These clusters form the basis of a typology representing the range of socio-economic and demographic outcomes at the non-metropolitan level.
Peer Reviewed Yes
Published Yes
Publisher URI http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/00049182.asp
Alternative URI http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00049180600672367
Copyright Statement Australia's large regional cities and towns display a wide variation in their adjustment to the socio-economic transitions that have occurred over the past decade. In terms of socio-economic advantage and disadvantage, these changes, often associated with globalisation, wider economic and technological restructuring, the changing demographics of the population and shifts in public policy, are not evenly dispersed across non-metropolitan regions. Such outcomes have been discussed across a variety of academic disciplines using a variety of data and methods, and the research undertaken has provided a useful grounding for contemporary studies both theoretically and methodologically. Analysis of new data provides an opportunity to extend and update our understanding. This paper presents an analysis of secondary data aimed at analysing non-metropolitan cities, towns and regions based on differential levels of socio-economic performance. Using an alternative clustering method, this paper groups non-metropolitan cities, towns and regions according to the degree to which they share similar socio-economic and demographic outcomes. These clusters form the basis of a typology representing the range of socio-economic and demographic outcomes at the non-metropolitan level.
Volume 37
Issue Number 2
Page from 233
Page to 258
ISSN 0004-9182
Date Accessioned 2006-07-11
Date Available 2008-11-12T02:30:18Z
Language en_AU
Research Centre Population and Social Health Research Program
Faculty Faculty of Environmental Sciences
Subject Urban and Regional Studies
URI http://hdl.handle.net/10072/13851
Publication Type Journal Articles (Refereed Article)
Publication Type Code c1

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