Mock-Suspects' Decisions to Confess: The Influence of Eyewitness Statements and Identifications.

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Title Mock-Suspects' Decisions to Confess: The Influence of Eyewitness Statements and Identifications.
Author Kebbell, Mark Rhys; Daniels, Troy
Journal Name Psychiatry, Psychology and Law
Year Published 2006
Place of publication Bowen Hills, Qld
Publisher Australian Academic Press
Abstract An experiment was conducted to investigate ways of increasing the likelihood of an offender confessing. Ninety participants were asked to commit a mock-crime that involved them stealing a wallet. Later the mock-offenders were presented with evidence from a witness who was said to have seen the offence. Participants were randomly assigned to one of three conditions in which they were presented with a witness statement that either contained detailed correct information, not-detailed correct information, or incorrect information. Further, half in each condition were told the witness had identified them, while the other half were told the witness had not identified them. Participants were asked about their likelihood of confessing to the crime, and were asked what had influenced their decision. The results indicate that incorrect information made offenders less likely to confess, while being identified or not, had no impact. The results are discussed in relation to police interviewing techniques.
Peer Reviewed Yes
Published Yes
Publisher URI http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/13218719.asp
Alternative URI http://dx.doi.org/10.1375/pplt.13.2.261
Volume 13
Issue Number 2
Page from 261
Page to 268
ISSN 1321-8719
Date Accessioned 2007-01-11
Date Available 2009-11-05T06:04:10Z
Language en_AU
Research Centre ARC Centre of Excellence in Policing and Security
Faculty Griffith Health Faculty
Subject PRE2009-Psychology
URI http://hdl.handle.net/10072/14215
Publication Type Journal Articles (Refereed Article)
Publication Type Code c1

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