Hume's History, Smith's Sentiments, Ferguson's Essay; Civilisation, War and the Scottish Enlightenment

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Title Hume's History, Smith's Sentiments, Ferguson's Essay; Civilisation, War and the Scottish Enlightenment
Author Buchan, Bruce Alexander
Publication Title Proceedings of the Australasian Political Studies Association Conference 2003
Editor D.M. Jones
Year Published 2003
Place of publication Hobart
Publisher Australasian Political Studies Association
Abstract For many of the major thinkers associated with the Scottish Enlightenment, civilisation was not merely a condition of refinement, but a process of social development. Many of these thinkers sought to identify the major moral, social, economic and historical forces that drove this process forward. Typically, commentators have identified the role of economic development (specifically, commerce and trade), the extension of self-interest, the growth of sociality, or the division of labour as among the most important of those forces. It will be argued in this paper however, that alongside these explanations was a shared emphasis among key Scottish Englightenment thinkers on the military underpinnings of the civilising process. The theories of civilisation developed by David Hume, Adam Smith, and Adam Ferguson shared a 'military template', and this paper will focus on the main features of that template, identifying strong connections as well as some of the tensions between their analyses of the civilising process.
Peer Reviewed Yes
Published Yes
Publisher URI http://www.auspsa.org.au/
Alternative URI http://www.utas.edu.au/government/APSA/APSAHome.html
Copyright Statement Copyright 2003 Australasian Political Studies Association (APSA). This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Use hypertext link to access conference website.
Conference name Australasian Political Studies Association Conference
Location Hobart
Date From 2003-09-29
Date To 2003-10-01
URI http://hdl.handle.net/10072/1641
Date Accessioned 2004-02-19
Date Available 2008-05-20T06:55:25Z
Language en_AU
Research Centre Griffith Institute for Educational Research
Faculty Faculty of Arts
Subject Political Theory and Political Philosophy
Publication Type Conference Publications (Full Written Paper - Refereed)
Publication Type Code e1

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