Jihad, Competing Norms, and the Israel-Palestine Impasse

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Title Jihad, Competing Norms, and the Israel-Palestine Impasse
Author Rane, Halim
Journal Name Australian Journal of International Affairs
Year Published 2009
Place of publication United Kingdom
Publisher Routledge
Abstract A central factor in the failure to resolve the Israel-Palestine conflict is the direct competition that exists between its two most central international norms: 'self determination', the fundamental claim of the Palestinians, and 'self-defence', the overriding concern of Israelis. Particularly since 9/11, Palestinian violence has been a liability for their cause and has served to validate Israel's self-defence arguments. Increasingly, Palestinian violence has been perpetrated by the Islamically oriented under the banner of jihad, which is understood almost exclusively in terms of armed struggle. Nonviolence which has the potential to undermine Israel's self-defence arguments and generate external pressure on Israel to adhere to the terms of a just peace has been under-appreciated by such Palestinians. Nonviolence is far from having a normative status in the Muslim world as an Islamically legitimate response to occupation and it is yet to be conceptualised as an effective form of resistance. The concept needs to be reformulated in accordance with the realities and opportunities confronting the Palestinians. Contextualisation combined with a maqasid or objective-oriented approach establishes non-violence as a preferable option to violence both in terms of the higher objectives of jihad, enshrined in the Quran, as well as of the attainment of Palestinian self-determination.
Peer Reviewed Yes
Published Yes
Alternative URI http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10357710802666125
Volume 63
Issue Number 1
Edition March
Page from 41
Page to 63
ISSN 1035-7718
Date Accessioned 2009-06-02
Date Available 2010-01-22T06:23:06Z
Language en_AU
Research Centre Griffith Centre for Cultural Research
Faculty Faculty of Humanities and Social Science
Subject International Relations
URI http://hdl.handle.net/10072/28406
Publication Type Journal Articles (Refereed Article)
Publication Type Code c1

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