The effect of a short one-on-one nursing intervention on knowledge, attitudes and beliefs related to response to acute coronary syndrome in people with coronary heart disease: A randomized controlled trial

File Size Format
56545_1.pdf 243Kb Adobe PDF View
Title The effect of a short one-on-one nursing intervention on knowledge, attitudes and beliefs related to response to acute coronary syndrome in people with coronary heart disease: A randomized controlled trial
Author McKinley, Sharon; Dracup, Kathleen; Moser, Debra K; Riegel, Barbara; Doering, Lynn V; Meischke, Hendrika; Aitken, Leanne Maree; Buckley, Tom; Marshall, Andrea; Pelter, Michele
Journal Name International Journal of Nursing Studies
Year Published 2009
Place of publication United Kingdom
Publisher Elsevier
Abstract Background Coronary heart disease (CHD) and acute coronary syndrome (ACS) remain significant public health problems. The effect of ACS on mortality and morbidity is largely dependent on the time from symptom onset to the time of reperfusion, but patient delay in presenting for treatment is the main reason timely reperfusion is not received. Objectives We tested the effect of an education and counseling intervention on knowledge, attitudes and beliefs about ACS symptoms and the appropriate response to symptoms, and identified patient characteristics associated with changes in knowledge, attitudes and beliefs over time. Methods We conducted a two-group randomized controlled trial in 3522 people with CHD. The intervention group received a 40 min, one-on-one education and counseling session. The control group received usual care. Knowledge, attitudes and beliefs were measured at baseline, 3 and 12 months using the ACS Response Index and analyzed with repeated measures analysis of variance. Results Knowledge, attitudes and beliefs scores increased significantly from baseline in the intervention group compared to the control group at 3 months, and these differences were sustained at 12 months (p = .0005 for all). Higher perceived control over cardiac illness was associated with more positive attitudes (p < .0005) and higher state anxiety was associated with lower levels of knowledge (p < .05), attitudes (p < .05) and beliefs (p < .0005). Conclusion A relatively short education and counseling intervention increased knowledge, attitudes and beliefs about ACS and response to ACS symptoms in individuals with CHD. Higher perceived control over cardiac illness was associated with more positive attitudes and higher state anxiety was associated with lower levels of knowledge, attitudes and beliefs about responding to the health threat of possible ACS.
Peer Reviewed Yes
Published Yes
Alternative URI http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2009.01.012
Copyright Statement Copyright 2009 Elsevier. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.
Volume 46
Page from 1037
Page to 1046
ISSN 0020-7489
Date Accessioned 2009-07-15
Date Available 2010-07-02T06:53:45Z
Language en_AU
Research Centre Griffith Health Institute; Centre for Health Practice Innovation
Faculty Griffith Health Faculty
Subject Clinical Nursing: Secondary (Acute Care)
URI http://hdl.handle.net/10072/28582
Publication Type Journal Articles (Refereed Article)
Publication Type Code c1

Show simple item record

Griffith University copyright notice