Police officers' views of effective interview tactics with suspects: The effects of weight of case evidence and discomfort with ambiguity

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Title Police officers' views of effective interview tactics with suspects: The effects of weight of case evidence and discomfort with ambiguity
Author Häkkänen, Helinä; Ask, Karl; Kebbell, Mark Rhys; Alison, Laurence; Granhag, Pär Anders
Journal Name Applied Cognitive Psychology
Year Published 2009
Place of publication United Kingdom
Publisher John Wiley & Sons
Abstract This study examined the effects of case-specific facts and individual discomfort with ambiguity (DA) on investigators' beliefs concerning effective interviewing tactics for suspects. Violent crime investigators (n¼30) responded to a questionnaire including the Need for Closure Scale (NFCS) and ratings of the importance of 39 interrogation tactics in two hypothetical interrogations with a homicide suspect, where the evidence consisted of either technical evidence or soft information. Twenty tactics were analysed with a multidimensional scaling procedure which confirmed two discrete interviewing themes: humane and dominant. More tactics, both dominant and humane, were rated as important if the evidence was soft compared with technical. In the soft evidence condition, investigators who were high on DA rated both types of tactics as more important than did low-DA investigators. In the technical evidence condition, no such difference emerged.
Peer Reviewed Yes
Published Yes
Alternative URI http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acp.1491
Copyright Statement Copyright 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. This is the pre-peer reviewed version of the following article: Police officers' views of effective interview tactics with suspects: The effects of weight of case evidence and discomfort with ambiguity, Applied Cognitive Psychology, Volume 23, Issue 4, pages 468–481, May 2009, which has been published in final form at http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acp.1491
Volume 23
Issue Number 4
Page from 468
Page to 481
ISSN 0888-4080
Date Accessioned 2010-03-05
Date Available 2010-08-17T05:03:18Z
Language en_AU
Research Centre ARC Centre of Excellence in Policing and Security
Faculty Griffith Health Faculty
Subject Forensic Psychology
URI http://hdl.handle.net/10072/30300
Publication Type Journal Articles (Refereed Article)
Publication Type Code c1

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