Clinically-indicated replacement versus routine replacement of peripheral venous catheters

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Title Clinically-indicated replacement versus routine replacement of peripheral venous catheters
Author Webster, Joan; Osborne, Sonya; Hall, Jennifer; Rickard, Claire
Journal Name Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
Year Published 2010
Place of publication United Kingdom
Publisher John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
Abstract Most hospital patients receive fluids or medications via an intravenous catheter at some time during their hospital stay. An intravenous catheter is a short, hollow tube placed in the vein to allow administration ofmedications, fluids or nutrients directly into the bloodstream (also called a drip). These catheters are routinely replaced every three to four days, to try to prevent infection of the vein or of the blood. However, the evidence to support this practice is weak. Moreover, the procedure may cause considerable discomfort to patients and is quite costly. This review included all of the randomised controlled trials, which have compared routine catheter changes with changing the catheter only if there were signs of inflammation or infection. We found no evidence of benefit from these trials to support current practice of changing catheters every three to four days.
Peer Reviewed Yes
Published Yes
Alternative URI http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/14651858.CD007798
Copyright Statement Copyright 2010 The Cochrane Collaboration. Published by JohnWiley & Sons, Ltd. This review is published as a Cochrane Review in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2010, Issue 3. Cochrane Reviews are regularly updated as new evidence emerges and in response to comments and criticisms, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews should be consulted for the most recent version of the Review.
Volume 2010
Issue Number 3
Page from 1
Page to 39
ISSN 1469-493X
Date Accessioned 2010-05-11
Language en_AU
Research Centre Centre for Health Practice Innovation; Griffith Health Institute
Faculty Griffith Health Faculty
Subject Medical and Health Sciences
URI http://hdl.handle.net/10072/32191
Publication Type Journal Articles (Refereed Article)
Publication Type Code c1

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