Repetition of suicide attempts : data from emergency care settings in five culturally different low- and middle-income countries participating in the WHO SUPRE-MISS study

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Title Repetition of suicide attempts : data from emergency care settings in five culturally different low- and middle-income countries participating in the WHO SUPRE-MISS study
Author Bertole, Jose M.; Fleischmann, Alexandra; De Leo, Diego; Phillips, Michael R.; Botega, Neury J.; Vijayakumar, Lakshmi; Silva, Damani De; Schlebusch, Lourens; Nquyen, Van Tuong; Sisask, Merike; Bolhari, Jafar; Wasserman, Danuta
Journal Name Crisis: The Journal of Crisis Intervention and Suicide Prevention
Year Published 2010
Place of publication United States
Publisher Hogrefe Publishing
Abstract Background: Attempted suicide is a strong risk factor for subsequent suicidal behaviors. Innovative strategies to deal with people who have attempted suicide are needed, particularly in resource-poor settings. Aims: To evaluate a brief educational intervention and periodic follow-up contacts (BIC) for suicide attempters in five culturally different sites (Campinas, Brazil; Chennai, India; Colombo, Sri Lanka; Karaj, Islamic Republic of Iran; and Yuncheng, People's Republic of China) as part of the WHO Multisite Intervention Study on Suicidal Behaviors (SUPRE-MISS). Methods: Among the 1,867 suicide attempters enrolled in the emergency departments of the participating sites, 922 (49.4%) were randomly assigned to a brief intervention and contact (BIC) group and 945 (50.6%) to a treatment as usual (TAU) group. Repeated suicide attempts over the 18 months following the index attempt – the secondary outcome measure presented in this paper – were identified by follow-up calls or visits. Subsequent completed suicide – the primary outcome measure – has been reported in a previous paper. Results: Overall, the proportion of subjects with repeated suicide attempts was similar in the BIC and TAU groups (7.6% vs. 7.5%, χ² = 0.013; p = .909), but there were differences in rates across the five sites. Conclusions: This study from five low- and middle-income countries does not confirm the effectiveness of brief educational intervention and follow-up contacts for suicide attempters in reducing subsequent repetition of suicide attempts up to 18 months after discharge from emergency departments.
Peer Reviewed Yes
Published Yes
Alternative URI http://dx.doi.org/10.1027/0227-5910/a000052
Volume 31
Issue Number 4
Page from 194
Page to 201
ISSN 0227-5910
Date Accessioned 2011-01-07
Language en_AU
Research Centre Australian Institute for Suicide Research and Prevention
Faculty Griffith Health Faculty
Subject Psychology
URI http://hdl.handle.net/10072/35652
Publication Type Journal Articles (Refereed Article)
Publication Type Code c1

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