Introduction to the special issue—Journeys along the Silk Road: Intercultural approaches to comparative business systems and practices

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Title Introduction to the special issue—Journeys along the Silk Road: Intercultural approaches to comparative business systems and practices
Author Weir, David; Hutchings, Kate
Journal Name Thunderbird International Business Review
Year Published 2006
Place of publication United States
Publisher John Wiley & Sons
Abstract For 2,000 years, the Silk Road has linked the cultures of the Arab World and northern Asia. Medieval travelers like Ibn Battuta and Marco Polo traded in ideas as well as tangible commodities. Mutual influences between these two worlds have been interpenetrating in their long-lasting impact on business practices and management philosophies. The Silk Road is a network of routes over 6,000 kilometers long, composed of tarmac highways, desert tracks, caravan routes, and long-forgotten paths, linking the major epicenters of civilization. Since records began, it has been the region through which East has met West, providing a conduit for the material goods, invading armies, fleeing refugees, technological innovation, mathematics, empirical science, and language that have shaped the trajectory and framed the styles of European and Asian history and culture. Today, in its geopolitical implications, the region comprising the Silk Road is as influential for the twenty-first century as at any time in the past millennium.
Peer Reviewed No
Published Yes
Alternative URI http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/tie.20081
Volume 48
Issue Number 1
Page from 1
Page to 7
ISSN 1096-4762
Date Accessioned 2010-10-22
Date Available 2011-02-15T12:55:24Z
Language en_AU
Research Centre Centre for Work, Organisation and Wellbeing
Faculty Griffith Business School
Subject Human Resources Management
URI http://hdl.handle.net/10072/36235
Publication Type Letter or Note
Publication Type Code c3

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