Are Female Stalkers More Violent Than Male Stalkers? Understanding Gender Differences in Stalking Violence Using Contemporary Sociocultural Beliefs

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Title Are Female Stalkers More Violent Than Male Stalkers? Understanding Gender Differences in Stalking Violence Using Contemporary Sociocultural Beliefs
Author Thompson, Carleen Marie; Dennison, Susan Michelle; Stewart, Anna Louise
Journal Name Sex Roles
Year Published 2012
Place of publication United States
Publisher Springer
Abstract This study investigated gender differences in the perpetration of stalking violence and how sociocultural beliefs may account for these differences/similarities. A sample of 293 Australian undergraduate and postgraduate students classified as relational stalkers completed a self-report questionnaire assessing violence perpetration (no/moderate/severe violence) and sociocultural beliefs (justifications for relational violence; assessments of target fear). Female relational stalkers perpetrated elevated rates of moderate violence; however, there were no gender differences for severe violence. Both male and female relational stalkers were more supportive of justifications for female-perpetrated relational violence than male-perpetrated relational violence. Violent male relational stalkers were more likely to believe they caused fear/harm than their female counterparts. These findings are interpreted in the context of sociocultural beliefs that view male-to-female violence as more unacceptable and harmful than female-to-male violence.
Peer Reviewed Yes
Published Yes
Alternative URI http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11199-010-9911-2
Copyright Statement Copyright 2010 Springer Netherlands. This is an electronic version of an article published in Sex Roles, 68148. Sex Roles is available online at: http://www.springerlink.com/ with the open URL of your article.
Volume 66
Issue Number 5-6
Page from 351
Page to 365
ISSN 0360-0025
Date Accessioned 2011-02-08
Date Available 2014-08-28T05:05:23Z
Language en_US
Research Centre Key Centre for Ethics, Law, Justice and Governance
Faculty Arts, Education and Law
Subject Studies in Human Society
URI http://hdl.handle.net/10072/36813
Publication Type Journal Articles (Refereed Article)
Publication Type Code c1

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