The influence of lawyers' questions on witness accuracy, confidence and reaction times and on mock-jurors' interpretation of witness accuracy

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Title The influence of lawyers' questions on witness accuracy, confidence and reaction times and on mock-jurors' interpretation of witness accuracy
Author Kebbell, Mark Rhys; Evans, Laura Kate; Johnson, Shane J.
Journal Name Journal of Investigative Psychology and Offender Profiling
Year Published 2010
Place of publication United Kingdom
Publisher John Wiley
Abstract Two studies demonstrate the influence of lawyers' complex questions on mock-witness accuracy, confidence, and reaction times and on the interpretation of witness accuracy by mock jurors. In study one, 32 mock witnesses were shown a short film and then questioned either with lawyers' complex questions or simple alternatives. In Study 2, 20 mock jurors viewed video footage of the mock witnesses assigned to each of the two previous conditions and were asked to rate their confidence in the witnesses' answers. The findings of the two studies indicated that lawyers' use of confusing questions reduce not only accuracy but also speed of response and both witnesses' and jurors' ability to determine accuracy. The implication of these findings is straightforward, lawyers should ask simple questions wherever possible.
Peer Reviewed Yes
Published Yes
Alternative URI http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jip.125
Copyright Statement Copyright 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. This is the pre-peer reviewed version of the following article: The influence of lawyers' questions on witness accuracy, confidence and reaction times and on mock-jurors' interpretation of witness accuracy, Journal of Investigative Psychology and Offender Profiling 7(3), 2010, pp. 261-271, which has been published in final form at http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jip.125
Volume 7
Issue Number 3
Page from 261
Page to 271
ISSN 1544-4767
Date Accessioned 2011-02-09
Language en_AU
Research Centre ARC Centre of Excellence in Policing and Security
Faculty Griffith Health Faculty
Subject Forensic Psychology
URI http://hdl.handle.net/10072/36930
Publication Type Journal Articles (Refereed Article)
Publication Type Code c1

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