Travel Noises: the displacement of bodies and remote landing sites in some recent sound works

There are no files associated with this record.

Title Travel Noises: the displacement of bodies and remote landing sites in some recent sound works
Author Humphrey, Tim
Publication Title AG3: The Third International Arakawa and Gins: Architecture and Philosophy Conference
Year Published 2010
Place of publication Queensland, Australia
Publisher Griffith University
Abstract Many artistic works with sound often reach to extremes of dislocation and disembodiment. The sense of temporal disclosure that is intrinsic to musical composition is lost in frozen fields of looping sound sources to which the body must become similarly frozen, tethered, and inert, and denied the permissions for acclamation or other spectatorial response that even the impoverished rituals of recital performance are able to provide. To re-connect the body in motion to sound works is to create a “landing site”, a visceral and material form that invites a journey through pathways of sonic disclosure. With personal sound devices, sound and music form an arbitrary accompaniment to literal urban journeys as a high-intensity and disjunct flânerie that often leaks its content, adding a high-frequency filigree to the ambient noises, of public transport of all kinds. An alternative is to consider the manipulation of plastic forms as an articulated surround sound instrument, assemblages of new and found materials that have a material and acoustic presence. The audience as the player of musical instruments. This paper considers the contemporary appropriation and dislocation of sonic artefacts and the body architectures that can help to make their new and temporary locations living places. The ghostly and interminable images of recorded sound are replaced in many recent works through an interactivity that allows artistic process to be held in the hand and carried by the spectator. When sonic artefacts threaten to disappear into vast tracts of memory and remote clouds, the scale of carriage by hand can shape meaningful articulations of the torrent.
Peer Reviewed No
Published Yes
Publisher URI http://ag3.griffith.edu.au/
Conference name AG3: The Third International Arakawa and Gins: Architecture and Philosophy Conference
Location Online
Date From 2010-03-12
Date To 2010-07-26
URI http://hdl.handle.net/10072/37447
Date Accessioned 2010-07-13
Date Available 2011-03-21T07:22:00Z
Language en_AU
Faculty Arts, Education and Law
Subject Performing Arts and Creative Writing
Publication Type Conference Publications (Full Written Paper - Non-Refereed)
Publication Type Code e2

Brief Record

Griffith University copyright notice