Human Metapneumovirus Establishes Persistent Infection in the Lungs of Mice and Is Reactivated by Glucocorticoid Treatment

There are no files associated with this record.

Title Human Metapneumovirus Establishes Persistent Infection in the Lungs of Mice and Is Reactivated by Glucocorticoid Treatment
Author Liu, Yuru; Haas, Debra L.; Poore, Spencer; Isakovic, Sanjin; Gahan, Michelle; Mahalingam, Suresh; Fu, Zhen F.; Tripp, Ralph A.
Journal Name Journal of Virology
Year Published 2009
Place of publication United States
Publisher American Society for Microbiology
Abstract Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) has been identified as a worldwide agent of serious upper and lower respiratory tract infections in infants and young children. HMPV is second only to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) as a leading cause of bronchiolitis, and, like RSV, consists of two major genotypes that cocirculate and vary among communities year to year. Children who have experienced acute HMPV infection may develop sequelae of wheezing and asthma; however, the features contributing to this pathology remain unknown. A possible mechanism for postbronchiolitis disease is that HMPV might persist in the lung providing a stimulus that could contribute to wheezing and asthma. Using immunohistochemistry to identify HMPV-infected cells in the lungs of mice, we show that HMPV mediates biphasic replication in respiratory epithelial cells then infection migrates to neuronal processes that innervate the lungs where the virus persists with no detectable infection in epithelial cells. After glucocorticoid treatment, the virus is reactivated from neural fibers and reinfects epithelial cells. The findings show that HMPV persists in neural fibers and suggest a mechanism for disease chronicity that has important implications for HMPV disease intervention strategies.
Peer Reviewed Yes
Published Yes
Alternative URI http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.00379-09
Volume 83
Issue Number 13
Page from 6837
Page to 6848
ISSN 0022-538X
Date Accessioned 2011-07-15
Language en_AU
Research Centre Institute for Glycomics
Faculty Faculty of Science, Environment, Engineering and Technology
Subject Microbiology
URI http://hdl.handle.net/10072/39894
Publication Type Journal Articles (Refereed Article)
Publication Type Code c1x

Show simple item record

Griffith University copyright notice