Creating pathways to participation: A community-based developmental prevention project in Australia

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Title Creating pathways to participation: A community-based developmental prevention project in Australia
Author Freiberg, Kathryn Jeanette; Homel, Ross; Batchelor, Samantha Jane; Carr, Angela Eileen; Hay, Ian Douglas; Elias, Gordon Christopher; Teague, Rosemary Judith Patricia; Lamb, Cherie
Journal Name Children & Society
Year Published 2005
Place of publication UK
Publisher Blackwell Publishing
Abstract Pathways to Prevention is a developmental prevention project focused on the transition to school in a disadvantaged multicultural urban area in Queensland. The project incorporates two elements: The Preschool Intervention Program (PIP) promotes communication and social skills related to school success; and the Family Independence Program (FIP) (parent training, facilitated playgroups, support groups, etc) promotes family capacity to foster child development. Using a quasi-experimental design (N = 597), improvements in boys' but not girls' behaviours over the preschool year were found. FIP reached more than a quarter of the target population, including many difficult-to-reach families experiencing high stress. Case studies and other qualitative data suggest positive outcomes. Copyright © 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Peer Reviewed Yes
Published Yes
Publisher URI http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/4805/home
Alternative URI http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/chi.867
Copyright Statement Copyright 2005 Blackwell Publishing. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher, for your personal use only. No further distribution permitted. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.
Volume 19
Issue Number 2
Edition April
Page from 144
Page to 157
ISSN 0951-0605
Date Accessioned 2006-03-16
Date Available 2009-12-07T03:35:03Z
Language en_AU
Comments The research reported in this paper was funded by grants from the Australian Research Council (Grant Number: C00107593), the Criminology Research Council (Grant Number: CRC 27/01-02), Mission Australia, and core Australian Research Council funding for the Key Centre for Ethics, Law, Justice and Governance.
Research Centre Key Centre for Ethics, Law, Justice and Governance
Faculty Faculty of Arts
Subject PRE2009-Criminology; PRE2009-Developmental Psychology and Ageing; PRE2009-Public Policy
URI http://hdl.handle.net/10072/4125
Publication Type Journal Articles (Refereed Article)
Publication Type Code c1

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