Interviewing rape complainants: Police officers' perceptions of interview format and quality of evidence

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Title Interviewing rape complainants: Police officers' perceptions of interview format and quality of evidence
Author Westera, Nina Jo; Kebbell, Mark Rhys; Milne, Rebecca
Journal Name Applied Cognitive Psychology
Year Published 2011
Place of publication United Kingdom
Publisher John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
Abstract This study explored police perceptions of video recording rape complainant interviews for investigative and evidential purposes. Officers (N¼136) rated the accuracy of one of three mock transcripts of a rape complainant video interview: A ‘standard interview’ containing inappropriately closed and leading questions; a ‘structured interview’ with open and appropriately closed questions and a ‘cognitive interview’ (CI) containing the CI mnemonics. Officers’ in the standard condition rated the complainant as less accurate and that they were less likely to proceed with charges than in the structured and CI conditions. Officers cited the main advantages of video interviewing as improved forensic quality and interviewing practices, and the ability to use the interview as good evidence. Officers’ rated the ideal characteristics of the complainant’s video interview similarly when used for investigative compared to evidential purposes. These findings suggest video recording complainant interviews may be one way of improving quality resolutions in rape cases.
Peer Reviewed Yes
Published Yes
Alternative URI http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acp.1770
Copyright Statement Copyright 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. This is the pre-peer reviewed version of the following article: Interviewing rape complainants: Police officers' perceptions of interview format and quality of evidence, Applied Cognitive Psychology, Vol. 25(6), 2011, pp. 917-926, which has been published in final form at http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acp.1770.
Volume 25
Issue Number 6
Page from 917
Page to 926
ISSN 1099-0720
Date Accessioned 2011-11-17
Language en_US
Research Centre ARC Centre of Excellence in Policing and Security
Faculty Arts, Education and Law
Subject Criminal Law and Procedure; Forensic Psychology
URI http://hdl.handle.net/10072/41862
Publication Type Journal Articles (Refereed Article)
Publication Type Code c1

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