An economic method for formulating better policies for positive child development

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Title An economic method for formulating better policies for positive child development
Author Manning, Matthew Garnet; Homel, Ross; Smith, Christine Ann
Journal Name Australian Review of Public Affairs
Year Published 2011
Place of publication Australia
Publisher The University of Sydney
Abstract Social scientists and education, health and human service practitioners recognise the benefits of primary prevention and early intervention compared with remedial alternatives. A recent meta-analytic review of early childhood prevention programs conducted by the authors demonstrates good returns on investment well beyond the early years, into and beyond adolescence. There are two methodological deficiencies in the current prevention literature: (1) the limited tools available to assist when making choices on resource allocation and engaging in a structured decision-making process with respect to alternative policy options for early prevention; (2) the absence of a rigorous tool for measuring the economic impact of early prevention programs on salient aspects of non health-related quality of life. This paper examines traditional economic methods of evaluation used to assess early prevention programs, and outlines a new method, adapted from the Analytical Hierarchy Process, that can be used to address these deficiencies.
Peer Reviewed Yes
Published Yes
Publisher URI http://www.australianreview.net/journal/v10/n1/manning_etal.html
Copyright Statement Copyright 2011 University of Sydney. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal website for access to the definitive, published version.
Volume 10
Issue Number 1
Page from 61
Page to 77
ISSN 1832-1526
Date Accessioned 2011-07-06
Date Available 2012-02-10T01:55:07Z
Language en_US
Research Centre Key Centre for Ethics, Law, Justice and Governance
Faculty Arts, Education and Law
Subject Applied Economics; Social Policy
URI http://hdl.handle.net/10072/41903
Publication Type Journal Articles (Refereed Article)
Publication Type Code c1

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