The effect of three different levels of footwear stability on pain outcomes in women runners: a randomised control trial

File Size Format
74683_1.pdf 371Kb Adobe PDF View
Title The effect of three different levels of footwear stability on pain outcomes in women runners: a randomised control trial
Author Ryan, Michael; Valiant, Gordon A.; McDonald, Kimberly; Taunton, Jack
Journal Name British Journal of Sports Medicine
Year Published 2011
Place of publication United Kingdom
Publisher BMJ Group
Abstract Background The present study examines the injury status in women runners who are randomised to receive a neutral, stability or motion control running shoe. Methods 81 female runners were categorised into three different foot posture types (39 neutral, 30 pronated, 12 highly pronated) and randomly assigned a neutral, stability or motion control running shoe. Runners underwent baseline testing to record training history, as well as leg alignment, before commencing a 13-week half marathon training programme. Outcome measures included number of missed training days due to pain and three visual analogue scale (VAS) items for pain during rest, activities of daily living and with running. Results 194 missed training days were reported by 32% of the running population with the stability shoe reporting the fewest missed days (51) and the motion control shoe (79) the most. There was a significant main effect (p<0.001) for footwear condition in both the neutral and pronated foot types: the motion control shoe reporting greater levels of pain in all three VAS items. In neutral feet, the neutral shoe reported greater values of pain while running than the stability shoe; in pronated feet, the stability shoe reported greater values of pain while running than the neutral shoe. No significant effects were reported for the highly pronated foot, although this was limited by an inadequate sample size. Conclusion The findings of this study suggest that our current approach of prescribing in-shoe pronation control systems on the basis of foot type is overly simplistic and potentially injurious.
Peer Reviewed Yes
Published Yes
Alternative URI http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bjsm.2009.069849
Copyright Statement Copyright remains with the authors 2011. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. For information about this journal please refer to the journal’s website or contact the authors.
Volume 45
Issue Number 9
Page from 715
Page to 721
ISSN 0306-3674
Date Accessioned 2011-12-13
Language en_US
Research Centre Centre for Musculoskeletal Research
Faculty Griffith Health Faculty
Subject Sports Medicine
URI http://hdl.handle.net/10072/41950
Publication Type Journal Articles (Refereed Article)
Publication Type Code c1x

Show simple item record

Griffith University copyright notice