A Capillary Tube Viscometer Designed for Measurements of Hydrogen Gas Viscosity at High Pressure and High Temperature

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Title A Capillary Tube Viscometer Designed for Measurements of Hydrogen Gas Viscosity at High Pressure and High Temperature
Author Yusibani, Elin; Nagahama, Yosuke; Kohno, Masamichi; Takata, Yasuyuki; Woodfield, Peter; Shinzato, Kanei; Fujii, Motoo
Journal Name International Journal of Thermophysics
Year Published 2011
Place of publication United States
Publisher Springer
Abstract A capillary tube viscometer was developed to measure the dynamic viscosity of gases for high pressure and high temperature. The apparatus is simple and designed for safe-handling operation. The gas was supplied to the capillary tube from a high-pressure reservoir tank through a pressure regulator unit to maintain a steady state flow. The measurements of a pressure drop across the capillary tube with high accuracy under extreme conditions are the main challenge for this method. A differential pressure sensor for high pressures up to 100MPa is not available commercially. Therefore, a pair of accurate absolute pressure transducers was used as a differential pressure sensor. Then the pressure drop was calculated by subtracting the outlet pressure from the inlet one with a resolution of 100Pa at 100MPa. The accuracy of the present measurement system is confirmed by measuring the viscosity of nitrogen as a reference gas. The apparatus provided viscosities of nitrogen from ambient temperature to 500K and hydrogen from ambient temperature to 400K and for pressures up to 100MPa with a maximum deviation of 2.2% compared with a correlation developed by the present authors and with REFPROP (NIST).
Peer Reviewed Yes
Published Yes
Alternative URI http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10765-011-0999-6
Volume 32
Issue Number 6
Page from 1111
Page to 1124
ISSN 1572-9567
Date Accessioned 2011-07-06; 2012-02-15T04:41:36Z
Date Available 2012-02-15T04:41:36Z
Research Centre Centre for Infrastructure Engineering and Management
Faculty Faculty of Science, Environment, Engineering and Technology
Subject Mechanical Engineering
URI http://hdl.handle.net/10072/42660
Publication Type Journal Articles (Refereed Article)
Publication Type Code c1

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