Planned Spatial Restructuring of Australian Cities: Are The Transport Benefits Of Employment Decentralisation Policies Greater Than Those Of Transit-Oriented Development?

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Title Planned Spatial Restructuring of Australian Cities: Are The Transport Benefits Of Employment Decentralisation Policies Greater Than Those Of Transit-Oriented Development?
Author Burke, Matthew Ian; Li, Terry; Dodson, Jago Robert
Publication Title State of Australian Cities Conference 2011 Proceedings
Editor Whitzman, Fincher
Year Published 2011
Place of publication Melbourne, Australia
Publisher State of Australian Cities Conference 2011
Abstract Perth and Brisbane are both subject to new state government office decentralisation policies. Unlike residential Transit-Oriented Development (TOD), which is proving difficult to achieve in practice, moving workplaces out of Australia’s highly centralised city centres is proving easier for governments to enact. Urban restructuring via employment decentralisation is thought to offer specific transport benefits and risks, yet these are mostly unexplored in the contemporary Australian context. This paper explores whether the transport benefits of planned employment decentralisation policies are greater than those of residential TOD, to help gauge whether Australian planners should give support to the decentralisation agenda. The efficacy of residential TOD as a means to change travel behaviour is summarised from a systematic review of previous studies. Modelling of an idealised employment decentralisation scenario for the year 2031 was produced for Brisbane to generate a set of likely travel behaviour changes. Methods for doing a comparative scenario for residential TOD are developed. The results suggest that planned decentralisation can improve transport systems and sustainability, particularly by reducing vehicle travel times, albeit after the short-term dislocations of workplace moves are resolved. The research brings into question the overwhelming and continued focus of much of the planning profession on residential TOD as the main (and sometime only) transport and land use intervention being harnessed to help alleviate traffic congestions and generate sustainable travel behaviour. A broader focus on urban structure in metropolitan transport and land use policy and planning appears warranted.
Peer Reviewed Yes
Published Yes
Publisher URI http://soac.fbe.unsw.edu.au/2011/index.html
Alternative URI http://soac.fbe.unsw.edu.au/2011/papers/SOAC2011_0082_final.pdf
Copyright Statement Copyright remains with the authors 2011. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. For information about this conference please refer to the conference’s website or contact the authos.
ISBN 978-0-646-56805-8
Conference name SOAC 2011
Location Melbourne, Australia
Date From 2011-11-30
Date To 2011-12-02
URI http://hdl.handle.net/10072/43553
Date Accessioned 2012-01-18
Date Available 2012-08-13T22:49:13Z
Language en_US
Research Centre Urban Research Program
Faculty Faculty of Science, Environment, Engineering and Technology
Subject Transport Planning
Publication Type Conference Publications (Full Written Paper - Refereed)
Publication Type Code e1

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