Obese adults’ preferences for fast food, convenience, semi-convenience and home-cooked meals during weight loss and their influence on weight/fat loss.

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Title Obese adults’ preferences for fast food, convenience, semi-convenience and home-cooked meals during weight loss and their influence on weight/fat loss.
Author Paul, Janine; Palmer, Michelle Ann; Capra, Sandra; Baines, Surinder
Publication Title Nutrition and Dietetics
Editor Linda Tapsell, Malcolm Riley
Year Published 2010
Place of publication Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Abstract Obese adults’ preferences for fast food, convenience, semi-convenience and home-cooked meals during weight loss and their influence on weight/fat loss. Janine Maree Paul1, Michelle Ann Palmer1, Sandra Capra2, Surinder Baines3 1 School of Public Health, Griffith University, Gold Coast, QLD 4222, Australia. 2 School of Human Movement Studies, University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD 4067 Australia 3 School of Health Sciences, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 Australia Obesity is increasing in Australia. Fast food consumption has increased significantly over 30 years. No system exists to classify mixed meals/snacks as convenience, semi-convenience, non-convenience or fast food preparation methods. We aimed to determine if an association between meal preparation methods and weight or fat loss existed in obese adults undertaking a 6-month weight loss RCT. Prescribed intakes of 5-7.5MJ were suggested. Weight and fat weight were measured monthly using bioimpedance. Participant dietary records for ≥four months intake, were classified into preparation methods using a system based on literature and dietetic consultation. Regression analysis assessed associations between preparation methods and weight or fat weight; t-tests between low and high consumers of each preparation method and age or gender; and ANOVAs between preparation options available for consumption and consumption frequency. Dietary completers (n=89, 64F:25M) were older (51±13vs.46±13) at baseline and achieved greater 6-month weight (8%±5%vs.3%±5%) and fat loss (12%±13%vs.1%±11%) than non-completers (n=90). Semi-convenience dinner meals were positively associated with 6-month weight (β=0.331,p=0.002) and fat loss (β=0.289,p=0.007). Non-convenience lunch and dinner meals were inversely associated with 6-month weight (β=-0.290,p=0.006) and fat loss (β=-0.267,p=0.012). Consumption was positively associated with preparation options made available (r=0.003-0.69,p=0.000). Regular fast food consumers were younger (48±14vs.56±11 years, p=0.020). This was the first study to investigate preparation methods chosen by obese adults undertaking a weight loss program. Preparation methods may impact health outcomes, including fast food in weight loss diets may not be detrimental to weight loss. Funding source: William Arnott scholarship Contact author: Janine Paul – janinex@live.com.au
Peer Reviewed No
Published Yes
Publisher URI http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ndi.2010.67.issue-s1/issuetoc
ISBN 1446-6368
Conference name Dietitians Association of Australia 2th National conference
Location Melbourne, Australia
Date From 2009-05-27
Date To 2009-05-29
URI http://hdl.handle.net/10072/46229
Date Accessioned 2010-06-25; 2012-08-12T23:22:07Z
Date Available 2012-08-12T23:22:07Z
Faculty Griffith Health Faculty
Subject Nutrition and Dietetics
Publication Type Conference Publications (Extract Paper)
Publication Type Code e3

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