Assessment of Nutritional Status in Haemodialysis Patients Using PG-SGA.

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Title Assessment of Nutritional Status in Haemodialysis Patients Using PG-SGA.
Author Desbrow, Ben; Bauer, Judith; Blum, Clauia; Kandasamy, Amutha; McDonald, Alison; Montgomery, Kate
Journal Name Journal of Renal Nutrition
Year Published 2005
Place of publication United States
Publisher W.B. Saunders Co.
Abstract Objective: To evaluate the scored Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment (PG-SGA) as a nutrition assessment tool in hemodialysis patients. Design: A cross-sectional observational study assessing the nutritional status of hemodialysis patients. Setting: Private tertiary Australian hospital. Subjects: Sixty patients, ages 63.9 +/- 16.2 years. Intervention: Scored PG-SGA questionnaire, comparison of PG-SGA score 9 with subjective global assessment (SGA), albumin, corrected arm muscle area, and triceps skinfold. Results: According to SGA, 80% of patients were well nourished and 20% of patients were malnourished. Patients classified as well nourished (SGA-A) attained a significantly lower median PG-SGA score compared with those rated as moderately malnourished or at risk of malnutrition (SGA-B). A PG-SGA score > or = 9 had a sensitivity of 83% and a specificity of 92% at predicting SGA classification. There were significant correlations between the PG-SGA score and serum albumin, PG-SGA score, and percentage weight loss over the past 6 months. There was no association between PG-SGA score and body mass index or anthropometric measurements. Conclusion: The scored PG-SGA is an easy-to-use nutrition assessment tool that allows quick identification of malnutrition in hemodialysis patients.
Peer Reviewed Yes
Published Yes
Volume 15
Issue Number 2
Page from 211
Page to 216
ISSN 1051-2276
Date Accessioned 2005-12-12
Date Available 2007-03-19T21:36:52Z
Language en_AU
Research Centre Centre for Health Practice Innovation; Griffith Health Institute
Faculty Griffith Health Faculty
Subject Nutrition and Dietetics
URI http://hdl.handle.net/10072/4874
Publication Type Journal Articles (Refereed Article)
Publication Type Code c1

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